Live News FAQ

Live News FAQ

FAQ, or ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ is an Internet convention. It is a single place where new users of a service can get help with the most common issues. It is an interesting term in some ways because it plays into that idea that we can ‘ask questions’ of a technological assemblage. A form of what we might call anthropomorphism. Anyway, FAQs for Live News Notes and Annotations.

What is a Live News note?
What can a Live News note be?
What should the LIve News note be about?
How many Live News Notes should I collect?
How do I present the Live New Notes for my assignment?
How do I know I’m collecting the right stuff?
Can I have the same Live New Notes as other students?
How do I reference in my assignment?
What is an annotation?
Can I see an example annotation?
How do I add an annotation?
What should an annotation say?
How long should an annotation be?
Can an annotation include a link to something else?
Should an annotation be in my own words?
Can I include a quote from someone?
Can I add to the annotation later?
How do I hand in my annotations?

What is a Live News note?
A Live News note is something you add to your Evernote Notebook from the Stream of news and content that computing and information technology enables every day.
What can a Live News note be?
Anything you like! Top Ten ideas:
1.    A web clipping from a new story someone pointed to on Twitter or anywhere else
2.    A YouTube video
3.    A TED talk
4.    A PDF of an a journal article you found in the Library
5.    A photo of a passage from a book
6.    An advert for a gadget
7.    An audio recording of a classroom discussion or lecture
8.    A posting on Facebook or Instagram or Pinterest or anywhere else
9.    A photo of a story in a newspaper you found on the Tube
10.    A podcast episode
What should the Live News note be about?
Again, anything. The obvious starting point is stories about technology: new launches, new debates or controversies or stories about computing and digital culture: discussions about social media and ‘radicalisation’, Twitter and the general election, etc. But you can clip other things too, anything you find interesting or in some way connected to the themes of the module. You make those connections in your annotation.
How many Live News Notes should I collect?
At least 20 but don’t aim for a number. Aim to get into the habit of looking around and monitoring what is going on in your subject and collecting or researching. Better to think of one or two a day.
How do I present the Live New Notes for my assignment?
Don’t worry, we’ll create a Panopto/podcast that explains that. Just concentrate on researching and annotating.
How do I know I’m collecting the right stuff?
Every week’s session finishes with you presenting a Live News note. If you are smart, you use this as a way of getting tutor feedback EVERY WEEK. You can also use it as a way of getting feedback from other students and sharing your notes with them.
Can I have the same Live New Notes as other students?
Of course. Your annotations will be different.
How do I reference in my assignment?
We’ll explain this in a Panopto/podcast but you should use Harvard referencing. Evernote automatically clips the web address if you have taken the Live News Note from the web and so writing the Harvard reference is easy – don’t worry, we’ll explain. If your LIve News Note was not from the web – eg you took a photo of a book page, make sure you also include a photo of the book’s details or write them into then note.
What is an annotation?
Some writing you add to the Live News Note you have added.
Can I see an example annotation?
http://www.evernote.com/l/AAGbbCqarwFOKqYqJsHs4JnEsQuA7w4MvsE
http://www.evernote.com/l/AAHPrfLy_2hOgbOmpMvFb9BuRyNDL3YYNV8
http://www.evernote.com/l/AAG9p7iLE6xM8prccQvwqYl9O08Dp05IC98
http://www.evernote.com/l/AAEQtPLymWxMgJ4BxnOUoSYHfbkUKOznBhQ
How do I add an annotation?
Just open the Live News Note. Click at the top and type.
What should an annotation say?
Annotating is about adding value. An annotation is your critical commentary or thought about the content you have added or collected. Top ten sorts of annotations:
1.    Interesting. “This story is interesting because in class we talked about…”
2.    Connecting. “This story is a bit like the example of…”
3.    Critiquing. “I disagree with the author’s point about… because…”
4.    Questioning: “I don’t understand the bit where she says…”
5.    Summarising: “The author’s central argument is…
6.    Commenting: “This development is important because…”
7.    Reflecting: “This story made me think about…”
8.    Self reflecting: “As I clipped this I looked at what I was doing and thought….”
9.    Conceptualising: “If we use the concept XXXX we can see this as an example of…”
10.    Puzzling: “I wonder if this is a bit like…”
How long should an annotation be?
One or more paragraphs in length. Avoid one line annotations. What we are looking for is evidence of an idea and something that adds value.
Can an annotation include a link to something else?
Yes. Could link to another Evernote note or a web site or anything else.
Should an annotation be in my own words?
Yes.
Can I include a quote from someone?
Yes but that must be clearly referenced using Harvard referencing and then include a bibliography – even if a bibliography of only one source.
Can I add to the annotation later?
Yes of course. As the module progresses you should be adding even more value to the Live New Notes you have collected. Simply open the Note and add another paragraph.
How do I hand in my annotations?
We’ll explain this in a Panopto/podcast but essentially you will cut and paste the annotations into a document including the Live New Note title and the URL of your Evernote notebook.

Assignment Task

Produce an annotated database of ‘Live News’ using Evernote and Google Docs/Sheets
You should use Evernote (www.evernote.com) to create, manage and develop a database of clippings and/or other notes from a range of sources and data relevant to the themes of the module.
Your Evernote notebook must include at least 20 Evernote notes (no maximum).
Your notes should include:
•    Web clippings
•    Google Docs or other Word-processed file
•    Google Sheets or other Spreadsheet file
•    Multimedia content
•    Images
Each Evernote note should be annotated with at least one paragraph of text in your own words. These annotations can be extra information or links, quotes (using Harvard Referencing style) or questions and ideas.
Your annotations should focus on:
•    The relationships between hardware and software and other computing actants
•    Explain how the technologies discussed in the story or information can enhance or change management functions.
•    The issues the story or information raises for business and/or organisations using computing technologies
You should use Evernote’s affordances to link and add value to your entries.
How to submit:
1)    Copy your annotations from Evernote into a single Google Docs document.
2)    Add the PUBLIC URL* of your Evernote notebook.
3)    Add your student ID.
4)    Download the Google Docs document
5)    Submit the completed document to Turnitin.
Submission must contain your text annotations, public URL of the Evernote notebook and student ID to be assessed. Only notes and annotations added before the hand-in date will be assessed
* To find your public URL:
1.    Click “i” on top right corner of open Evernote notebook.
2.    Select “modify sharing” button.
3.    Select “publish” button. Copy the public URL.
4.    Select “done” button.
5.    Test by logging out of your Evernote account. Can you still access the notebook using the public URL?

***In order to achieve your marks, your notebook should form a critical database of structured material that brings together the themes of the module with the latest news, debates and discussions. Your annotations and use of Evernote’s affordances should demonstrate an awareness of the potential and problems raised by networked data, news and information. ***

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